Oxford Flow expands global reach with trio of senior hires

OXFORD, UK AND HOUSTON, TX

Oxford Flow, the pressure control equipment specialist for the oil and gas, water and industrial process industries, is bolstering its team with three senior hires for the US and Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA). The appointments will enable the company to grow its market share across the regions.

Howard Williams has been appointed as Group Business Development Director to spearhead the company’s global sales efforts across the oil, gas and water markets. He joins Oxford Flow from Rotork, a flow control provider, where he spent three decades establishing an impressive track record for driving sales and growth across all product divisions. Operating from the company’s Oxford headquarters, he will lead the business development team as it expands into new geographies.

Williams will be joined by David Smith as Business Development Director for North America. Based in Houston, his appointment marks Oxford Flow’s first US employee – a key milestone in the company’s internationalisation. With 15 years’ oil and gas experience, most recently with oil and gas torque specialist Empire Torque Tools, and pressure control equipment provider, LinRich Solutions, he will be responsible for building Oxford Flow’s profile with operators and service companies in the US.

Neil Poxon, CEO of Oxford Flow, says: “These appointments signify a major step forward in our evolution. As we switch our strategy from product development to revenue generation, we need a high calibre team to capture the market for Pressure Reducing Valves (PRVs). Our technology drastically reduces maintenance costs over a project’s lifecycle. And that’s what matters to operators the world over – safe, reliable and cost-effective solutions.”

In addition, Jawaad Aziz has been hired to oversee business development for EMEA. Having lived and worked in the UAE for eight years, Aziz will leverage his local knowledge and established network to drive lead generation in the region.

Williams adds: “It’s incredibly exciting to be involved with such an innovative company that is changing the way we think about and use pressure control technology. Oxford Flow is truly transforming the PRV landscape – producing valves that are significantly lighter, smaller and more reliable than anything the market has seen before. That technology, combined with an ambitious and experienced team, forms a fantastic platform to grow the brand worldwide.”

Media contact

Louise Douglas, Aspectus Group

Louise.Douglas@aspectusgroup.com

+44 (0)1224 472 553


Smart valves: Water needs its iPhone moment

By Jon Daniels, Water Networks Specialist at Oxford Flow

It’s not easy being a water utility. Customers expect flawless service yet are also often the first to alert utilities to problems. Leaks continue to plague companies with both operational and reputational problems. Maintenance and diagnosis usually entails costly excavation works.

All of which is to say that water companies are actively looking for ways to be smarter. To know about (and fix) problems before the customer sees the effect, to better predict and more accurately map leakages to reduce losses and hone maintenance issues. To go from reactive to proactive.

But when up against increasing demands and often ageing infrastructure, that’s easier said than done. It’s unlikely we’ll get there with piecemeal improvements either – the industry needs a radical innovation moment that shakes up the fundamentals of how things work. Much like the iPhone did to the mobile phone market in 2007. And, as it turns out, valves are a good place to start.

Tough times for the industry

A ‘smart’ approach has long been on the industry’s wish list, but it becomes increasingly important day by day.

Just look at the outrage in the UK when hosepipe bans were suggested in response to a recent heatwave – outrageous, in the eyes of many, when weighed against the 3 billion litres of treated water lost every single day of 2017 in England and Wales. For the utilities, faced with the task of operating with and upgrading often Victorian era infrastructure, it’s very much a rock-and-a-hard-place situation.

And the UK is a relatively wet country. For utilities in drier climes such as the Middle East, there are other challenges. A 2017 report stated that the nations in the Gulf consume an average of roughly 816,000 litres of water per person per year – 65 per cent more than the world average. As a result, utilities such as the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority continue to invest heavily in smarter, upgraded systems.

As populations grow around the world, placing ever greater demands on water infrastructure, and climate change increases incidences of extreme weather such as drought, smarter approaches to water will become even more pressing.

A watershed moment needed

Of course, there has been innovation and improvement in the water sector over the years. But it has been an incremental kind, tweaking engineering designs and adding a patchwork of digital assets, such as pressure sensors here and there.

This incremental approach is crucial – as was the progression through Nokia 3210, 3310, 3410 – but now it’s time for the iPhone moment – something that makes a much more radical, lasting and digital change.

What does ‘smart’ mean now

Now though, we are at inflection point where the need for digitalisation is pressing and the technology is becoming mature enough to meet that need.

A smart system must be proactive, not reactive. That means predicting, identifying and (preferably) fixing problems before they affect customers – or if that’s not possible communicating ahead of time that there will be disruption.

This applies to leaks but also to water quality. At the moment, water quality is typically tested by taking samples from the tap and packing it off to a lab. There is no visibility within the distribution infrastructure.

So, imagine a system where problems are identifiable and fixable before they reach the customer. Where problems could be spotted and located to a fine level of granularity – making maintenance and repairs easier, cheaper and more efficient. Where, furthermore, utilities can optimise their systems against multiple parameters across the breadth of their network.

That would represent an iPhone moment, fundamentally altering the relationship utilities have with their infrastructure.

One crucial technology for realising this vision is the next generation of pressure reducing valves (PRVs). PRVs have been around for over a century, only recently undergoing significant innovation from an engineering standpoint. Now, however, they are undergoing a second, digital transformation.

Modern PRVs are equipped with sensors, collecting information on metrics such as pressure and even water quality. Crucially – thanks to modern, more affordable battery, communication and energy harvesting technologies – these can now feed this information back to the control room for analysis and action. For example, if leaks are detected, the valve can be controlled remotely to reduce pressure and therefore losses. PRVs will be the “smart valves” at the centre of an intelligently optimised and controlled network, used to deliver fine pressure control in any way needed.

The smartest systems will then use technologies such as modern data analysis and machine learning to constantly analyse that incoming stream of data to optimise maintenance schedules and asset replacement and even predict problems before they occur.

In a flash, utilities that implement such a system would find themselves managing lit networks, rather than dark ones; enjoying visibility and control that they never had before.

Future-proofing

Water infrastructure upgrades are expensive and time-consuming – creating truly smart networks is not a trivial matter. However, this would represent an iPhone moment in another respect: once the radical shift is made, the market can return to incremental innovation. The first iPhone may have been a revolution, but the subsequent models have been evolutions since.

Once a data-rich, sensor-soaked network is in the ground, utilities will be able to more easily implement incremental upgrades over time. Connectivity means that software and firmware can potentially be upgraded without excavation and the control room can invest in ever more advanced analytics.

A lot has been written about topics such as the industrial internet of things (IIoT). Undoubtedly, we stand to gain a great deal as societies from smart factories, grids and cities. But a smarter approach to water is an equally important step. With modern valve, sensor, communication, battery and energy harvesting technologies, forward-thinking utilities are poised to take it. By doing so we stand to cut leakages, improve water quality and utilities can enjoy their iPhone moment.


Water needs its iPhone Moment - cue the smart valve

By Jon Daniels, Water Networks Specialist at Oxford Flow

Water companies are actively looking for ways to be smarter. But when up against increasing demands and often ageing infrastructure, that’s easier said than done.

It’s unlikely we’ll get there with piecemeal improvements either – the industry needs radical innovation that fundamentally changes how things work. Much like the iPhone did to the mobile phone market in 2007. A ‘smart’ approach has long been on the industry’s wish list, but it becomes increasingly important day by day.

Look at the outrage in the UK when hosepipe bans were suggested in response to this summer’s heatwave. Especially when weighed against the 3 billion litres of treated water lost every single day of 2017 in England and Wales. For the utilities faced with the task of operating with and upgrading what is often Victorian era infrastructure, it’s very much a rock-and-a-hard-place.

Making waves…

There has been innovation and improvement in the water sector over the years. But it’s been incremental; tweaking engineering designs and adding a patchwork of digital assets, such as pressure sensors.

This incremental approach is crucial – as was the progression through Nokia 3210, 3310, 3410 – but now it’s time for the iPhone moment.

A smart system must be proactive, not reactive. That means predicting, identifying and fixing problems before they affect customers – or communicating disruption ahead of time. This applies to leaks but also to water quality. Currently there’s no visibility within the distribution infrastructure and water quality is typically tested by taking samples from the tap and packing it off to a lab.

Drenched in possibility…

Imagine a system where problems are identifiable and fixable before they reach the customer. Issues could be spotted and located to a fine level of granularity – making maintenance and repairs easier, cheaper and more efficient. Utilities are able to optimise their systems against multiple parameters across the breadth of their network.

But how do we make that a reality?

One crucial technology for realising this vision is the next generation of pressure reducing valves (PRVs). PRVs have been around for over a century, only recently undergoing innovation from an engineering standpoint. Now they’re undergoing a second, digital transformation.

Modern PRVs are equipped with sensors, collecting information on pressure and water quality. Crucially – thanks to modern, more affordable battery, communication and energy harvesting technologies – these can now feed this information back to the control room for analysis. For example, if leaks are detected, the valve can be controlled remotely to reduce pressure and therefore losses. PRVs will be the “smart valves” at the centre of an intelligently optimised and controlled network.

The smartest systems will use technologies such as analytics and machine learning to optimise maintenance schedules and asset replacement and even predict problems before they occur.

This would represent an iPhone moment: once the radical shift is made, the market can return to incremental innovation. The first iPhone may have been a revolution, but the subsequent models have been evolutions since.


Oxford Flow announces trial successes in Mexico

Oxford, UK, 19 July 2018 – Oxford Flow, the pressure control equipment specialist for the water, oil and gas and industrial process industries, has achieved qualification for its water pressure regulating valve (PRV) with Servicios de Agua y Drenaje de Monterrey (SADM), the potable water distribution company for Monterrey Municipality in Mexico, following two successful field trials.

SADM was facing a challenge to fill and accurately control the water level inside storage tanks at very low upstream pressures. Its incumbent valves were not delivering the required inlet flow or shutting off drip tight – resulting in costly wasted water through overflow, frequent and costly manual interventions and operational shutdowns.

Chosen for its reliable operation at very low pressures with minimal head loss, the innovative IP150 PRV technology was also trialled in Monterrey’s water distribution network. The PRV met all performance criteria during the trial including; low upstream pressure operation, low head loss (2m H2O) and smooth opening / closing transition to minimise pressure surges.  

Florentino Ayala, SADM Technical and Operations Director said: “This is the first time in 25 years of working with water PRVs, that I’ve seen a valve control the tanks and distribution network at very low pressures. Oxford Flow’s technology will avoid manual interventions and enable improved efficiencies through automated filling and control. This is such a simple and cost-effective solution that will really transform our daily operations.”

Neil Poxon, Oxford Flow CEO, says: “These field trial successes represent a significant milestone for Oxford Flow. By proving our technology in the Americas, it opens a new market for us. During the trials, we have learned more about how our PRVs operate, which will allow us to build our future offering. Our next step is to continue our growth in the Americas through select trials.”

Oxford Flow has already won 25 projects this year. Due to its continued success, the company has expanded into new headquarters in Oxford, UK and aims to hire 10 employees by the end of the year.

Media contact

Louise Douglas, Aspectus Group

Louise.Douglas@aspectusgroup.com

+44 (0)1224 472 553                                     


Oxford Flow ISO 9001:2015

Oxford Flow are delighted to announce that we have passed our second stage audit and look forward to receiving our ISO 9001:2015 Certificate from Alcumus ISOQAR.

ISO 9001:2015 is an international standard that specifies the requirements for a quality management system (QMS). Compliance demonstrates an ability to consistently provide products and services that meet or exceed customer and regulatory requirements.

The latest iteration provides a framework to respond to changes, in balance with society, economics and the environment.

Oxford Flow’s CEO, Neil Poxon commented:

“We are very proud to achieve ISO 9001:2015 Certification, as it recognises our efforts to implement best practices in all aspects of our work. The team’s rapid integration of these processes to facilitate the adoption is a testament to our values, and demonstrates that innovation and quality go hand in hand as standard at Oxford Flow.”


Innovation ‘green light’ from Southern Water for Oxford Flow's technology

Oxford Flow has been given the ‘green light’ through to the next stage of innovation deployment by Southern Water.

This follows British Water’s Innovation Exchange event with Southern Water at the National East Sussex on the 7th June. The event provided an excellent opportunity for a number of experts from within the water and wastewater industries the chance to showcase their products and solutions directly to decision-makers at Southern Water, who were then able to judge which businesses and technologies matched their current challenges and potentially offered value.

At the event - which focussed on the areas of Off-site, Resource Recovery, Carbon and Environment, Process, Control & Monitoring and Information modelling -Oxford Flow presented technical information and case studies of its innovative IP Series pressure reducing valve (PRV). Recent successful field trials with utility businesses including Veolia, Anglian Water and Northumbrian Water were also highlighted.

Discussing the Innovation Exchange, Christopher Leonard, Business Development Director at Oxford Flow commented:

“This event was a fantastic opportunity not only to share our own solutions for calming water networks and minimising leakage with our pressure control equipment but also learn more about other innovations in the water industry.

We’re delighted to be selected to progress to the next stage by Southern Water and look forward to sharing more about our product range with them in the near future.”


Fast growing Oxford engineering business recruits oil and gas industry leader

Fast growing engineering innovation business Oxford Flow has appointed oil and gas industry veteran Neil Poxon to develop the company’s focus on oil and gas markets.

The Oxford University spin-out, which is backed by Oxford Sciences Innovation (OSI) the £500m investment company committed to commercialising the best ideas from Oxford, has developed a pioneering range of pressure reducing valves and other technologies for managing gas and fluid flow across a range of applications.

Neil’s appointment follows the recent recruitment of Chairman Douglas Hansen-Luke, an expert in the Middle East, as the company signs its first Gulf region deal with the Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority (SEWA) in the UAE.

Neil brings with him almost 30 years of experience in the global oil and gas industry, in a career spanning Europe, the Middle East and the US. Having spent the earlier portion of his career in roles at TR Oil Services, Petrolite, and Champion Technologies, in 2000 Neil became the regional manager of US-based CETCO Oilfield Services, where he launched and developed the business’ UK and wider Eastern Hemisphere market. In 2006, he moved to the Industry Technology Facilitator (ITF) where, as Managing Director, he led the transformation of the organisation from an industry-owned not-for-profit technology facilitator to the largest and most respected supporter of oil industry technology worldwide. Following this, in 2012 he became CEO of ProSep Inc., a business providing specialist process separation solutions and surface treatment technologies for unwanted production of solids, water and other contaminants in the oilfield.

Finally, in 2015, Neil joined Peak Well Systems, a leading specialist in the design and development of advanced downhole tools for well intervention, as its Global Business Development Director, responsible for all sales, marketing and business development activities. His move to Oxford Flow comes after the acquisition of Peak Well Systems by oil and gas technology firm Schlumberger.

At Oxford Flow, he will be responsible for growing the innovative engineering business’ client base and overseeing the further development of its product range of Pressure Reducing Valves (PRVs), which were designed by Oxford Professor Tom Povey  –  now the business’ technical director – in the course of his research into jet engine designs. Smaller, lighter and more stable than competing designs, the valves have no diaphragm.  This gives them a ground-breaking reduction in maintenance costs.  The valves have been proven in water distribution applications, and are also available for gas distribution, process industry and oil and gas markets.

Discussing Neil’s appointment, the outgoing CEO Simon Hombersley, who launched the business with Professor Povey, said: “We’re fortunate to have secured such a strong industry figure as Neil, with his impressive track record in growing technology businesses in oil and gas markets and his experience of innovation.  I’m excited to be handing over the business to Neil as he grows the business through the next stages.”

Neil Poxon added: “This is a genuinely innovative business which has created a product that can make a tangible difference to the operations and profitability of businesses working in a number of sectors.

“I’m impressed by both the product and what has been achieved so far and look forward to working with the team to build on this success.”

Oxford Flow Chairman Douglas Hansen-Luke said: “We’re grateful to Simon for building the business in the launch period, and we’re delighted to bring Neil’s world class skills into Oxford Flow for the next phase.  Our vision is to be a world leader in valves and smart infrastructure, with Oxford Flow’s technology in every pipeline on the planet within a generation.  Neil’s experience of successfully building – and exiting – businesses in oil and gas markets puts the company in a strong position as we grow to achieve our ambition.”


Oxford Flow re-brands with new-look image

A new logo and branding are released to showcase the game-changing pressure control technology from Oxford Flow as the business continues to grow.

Today Oxford Flow's new website and corporate identity were launched. The new website leads heralds the start of more than just rebranding as new content and functionality are integrated into the site in the coming weeks.

Christopher Leonard, Business Development Director at Oxford Flow commented:

“Oxford Flow has grown rapidly and we wanted our brand and website to better represent the strength and innovation of the business

Our new logo and new website reflect our enhanced product range and the full breadth of the industries in which we can offer value.

Beyond these developments, we will be adding further content to the site and pushing the boundaries in terms of functionality to make this a central global knowledge hub for pressure and flow control experts".


Oxford Flow appoints new Compliance and PED Engineer

Oxford Flow has appointed a new Compliance and PED Engineer.

Luisa Orobia joins the company from Milton Keynes-based Murata Power Solutions, where she was a Quality Assurance Engineer with a specialism in electronic manufacturing. Prior to that, Luisa was based in Asia, where she held positions as a Process Integration Engineer at Globalfoundries in Singapore and Analog Devices in the Philippines.

Luisa’s role will largely be focussed on reporting, standardisation and pressure testing of Oxford Flow’s products as it works towards ISO 9001 certification.

Discussing her appointment, Luisa Orobia commented: “Oxford Flow’s products are genuinely innovative and I was immediately impressed by the real difference they will be able to make to process reliability in a number of different sectors.

“This is a fantastic business that is already making waves in the Oil & Gas and water industries and I’m delighted to be a part of it.”

Oxford Flow CEO Simon Hombersley added: “We’re working towards a number of accreditations and certifications as the natural next step in our development and Luisa’s expertise will no doubt play a key part us in helping us achieve these. We’re very pleased to have her join the team.”


Oxford Flow recruits new Principal Engineer

Oxford Flow has further strengthened its team with the recruitment of new principal engineer Ben Kirollos.

With a background in experimentation and theoretical/numerical modelling of high pressure and temperature systems, Ben Kirollos joins the business after recently completing a DPhil on state of the art jet engine cooling systems at the University of Oxford.

During the course of his studies, Ben carried out research into aerospace-grade composite materials at Diehl Aerosystems in Germany and re-entry of hypersonic vehicles at UNSW Canberra in Australia. He has also conducted research into medical imaging/computer simulation techniques with the Churchill Hospital Radiology Department in Oxford.

At Oxford Flow, Ben will be a key member of the expert technical team responsible for devising innovative flow solutions for the oil, gas and water industries.

Discussing his appointment, Ben commented: “I was drawn to Oxford Flow because the team here have created a range of genuinely innovative engineering solutions that will make a real difference to both efficiency and profitability in a number of different sectors. I can’t wait to get started.”


Oxford Flow kickstarts 2017 with recruitment of new Product Engineer

Oxford Flow has strengthened its team with the recruitment of product engineer Jamie Manson.

Joining the company from Rolls Royce, where he managed the supply chain of the Nuclear division in a Supplier Quality Role, he will be responsible for purchasing and supply chain management within the business as well as overseeing internal production.

An apprentice-trained engineer, Jamie graduated from Sheffield Hallam University in 2013 with a foundation degree in Integrated Engineering. While at Rolls Royce - which he initially joined as a higher manufacturing engineering apprentice - he supported multi-million pound projects and worked to incorporate lean six-sigma principles into external and internal production, developing specialisms including manufacturing, process and quality engineering.

Discussing his appointment Jamie Mason said: “I’m very pleased to be joining such an ambitious young company at such a crucial juncture of its development and helping to support it as its customer base grows.”

Oxford Flow’s CEO Simon Hombersley added: “Following several successful field trials with a number of household-name companies we will be increasing our production and disseminating our PRVs more widely. Jamie’s appointment as Product Engineer is an important step in our growth as a business and we’re delighted to have him on board.”


Oxford University Start-up Hires Industry Heavyweight Paul Johnson

University of Oxford engineering spin-out business Oxford Flow has bolstered its team with the appointment of IMechE fellow and industry heavy weight Paul Johnson as Engineering Manager.

Mr Johnson will be responsible for Engineering Management at the business, which has recently commercialised a highly innovative piston-led pressure reducing valve (PRV) for the water and oil and gas industries.

Paul Johnson began his career as Flow Programme Manager and Laboratory Manager at the National Engineering Laboratory in Scotland (now TUV NEL Ltd), before moving to the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) where he worked as Research Programme and Business Manager. More recently, he has held posts at OTM Consulting as Director and Oil & Gas Consultancy Programme Manager, and at technology and management consultancy PA Consulting, where he worked as Innovation Lead for the Energy and Utilities Practice in London.

With more than 25 years of experience in the engineering industry as a fluid flow specialist, Johnson has worked with the UK government on the UK’s Primary Standards for Flow and in an advisory capacity for many different flow device manufacturers. In the course of his career, he has deployed his expertise across a number of industries, including oil & gas, renewables, the environment, electricity distribution, aerospace and nuclear sectors.

Oxford Flow is funded by Oxford Sciences Innovation, a £350m company to support ambitious companies emanating from the University of Oxford. Now moving into the second phase of its growth, the business is also working with industry to provide bespoke solutions to engineering problems, harnessing the best of Oxford University’s internationally renowned expertise and the facilities at the world-leading Osney Thermo-Fluids Laboratory.

Discussing the appointment, Simon Hombersley, CEO of Oxford Flow, commented: “We’re delighted to have Paul on board. With his mix of technical expertise and commercial exposure, he is perfectly placed to help us build the business at this crucial stage of our growth.”

Paul Johnson added: “Joining the Oxford Flow team was an easy decision. The valve design that they have commercialised is genuinely innovative and the reaction from industry is already very favourable. I look forward to supporting the team in further developing their product and working with industry to provide bespoke engineering solutions.”


Experts Gather At Oxford Flow’s Pressure Talks

Senior figures in the utilities, oil & gas and process industries gathered in Oxford earlier this month, as Oxford Flow held its inaugural Pressure Talks symposium.

Designed as a forum for leaders in the area of process, operational, engineering, risk and asset management for pressure and flow control management, the event featured a number of talks from Oxford Flow’s experts, including:

Professor Tom Povey

The inventor of Oxford Flow’s unique piston-led system and renowned Professor of Engineering Science at the University of Oxford gave an overview of the world-class research being undertaken at the Osney Thermo-Fluid Laboratories, discussing advancements in areas such as gas dynamics, heat transfer, applied fluid dynamics and, of course,  innovative pressure and flow regulators.

Christopher Leonard

An expert in the industry, Christopher provided an insight into the key challenges facing the water, oil & gas and processing industries at present. Christopher also discussed how Oxford Flow’s  innovations in flow control management can help these sectors improve profitability and performance in the 21st century.

Dr Matt Collins and Dr Ben Hall

Engineering specialists, Dr Matt Collins and Dr Ben Hall shared the latest developments in the mathematical modelling of gas and liquid flow regulators and computational flow dynamics and discussed the wider impacts these innovations are going to have on the industry.

As part of the event, Oxford Flow’s guests were also treated to a rare opportunity to tour the Osney Thermo-Fluid Laboratories, where they were able to see first-hand the latest developments in jet propulsion, space technology and valve design.

Speaking after the event, Christopher Leonard, BD Director, said: “This event was a great opportunity to share our innovations with industry leaders and show just how the technology we’re developing can be practically applied.

“Flow regulation is a central part of performance in so many industries so our model – which essentially enables businesses to improve performance and reliability while driving down cost  –was very well received.”


Pressure Talks Symposium

Venue: The University of Oxford, Osney Thermo-Fluid Labs
Date: 10th May 2016
Time: 12 pm - 3 pm

The Pressure Talks symposium has been designed to benefit key stakeholders responsible for process, operational, engineering, risk and asset management for pressure and flow control management.

Tailor-made for the utilities, process and oil and gas industries, delegates will gain valuable insight and knowledge transfer from leading design, engineering and application experts including:


Oxford Flow To Exhibit At WRc Innovation Day

Oxford Flow is delighted to have been selected to exhibit at WRc's Innovation Day on the 27th April 2016.

Our team are looking forward to sharing knowledge and innovation at this premier event for the water industry.

We welcome you to visit us at the Innovation Showcase Exhibition and learn more about our game changing PRV technology for water networks.


Innovative Pressure Regulator Company Strengthens Commercial Team

Oxford Flow, the Oxford University spin-out developing innovative pressure regulators, has recruited an experienced industry figure as the company enters the market with new products.

Christopher Leonard joins the start-up as Business Development Director, the first hire since the investment by the company by the £320m investment company OSI. The appointment strengthens the company’s senior management team as it seeks to establish a technology leadership position across global markets.


£320m Investment Company Backs Innovative Valve

Oxford Flow, a developer of precision engineered products, has secured the first investment from Oxford’s new £320m investment company.


Oxford Flow wins VentureFest Competition

Oxford Flow won the prestigious ‘Pitching for Success’ prize, at this year’s VentureFest event.  The company emerged as the winner of the Dragon’s Den style competition after pitches from 25 entrepreneurial start-up companies.

Eileen Modral from Oxford Innovation, who led Pitching for Success said: “This year, companies gave some of the most exceptional business pitches I have seen over the past decade that I’ve been involved with the initiative.”


Flow Regulator Developer Secures Innovate UK Grant

Innovative flow regulator developer Oxford Flow has secured a Proof of Market grant from Innovate UK, the country’s innovation agency.

CEO Simon Hombersley: “This first grant is a great start for our new company, recently spun-out from Oxford University.  Our technology is already proven in the lab and initial test sites; it’s vital that we develop products specifically to meet the needs of our markets and our industrial customers. This grant will enhance and improve our understanding of industrial needs.”